Humans need problems

Humans are a creature of problem solving. They solve problems for they can sustain. They have the ability to create their own problems to be solved by themselves. Humans need problems.

We won’t invent a candle if we don’t need light, we won’t invent a boat if we don’t need to sail, we won’t invent coins of gold and silver if we don’t need to exchange our wealth

This is the paradox. We humans need problems and at the same time avoid them. We humans are inherently lazy to struggle if there is no pressing need. We won’t invent a candle if we don’t need light, we won’t invent a boat if we don’t need to sail, we won’t invent coins of gold and silver if we don’t need to exchange our wealth—the list continues on and on. So actually our ‘needs’ create problems. Because these needs are originated from the human itself, can we say that human is the problem?

I got into this thinking whenever I watched a movie. Few of them are psychologically repressing like Shutter Island and my favorite serial, Prison Break. In watching these movies, a thought popped in my head, “This world alone is already filled with tons of tons of problems, but why do these directors (and scriptwriters) care to create their own world of problem and solve it by themselves (a good or a bad ending doesn’t matter, as long as it is solved)?” Don’t these directors have anything else to do? Well, for one thing the filmmakers make a living out of this. And from the audiences’ perspective, we are also enjoying it. So, this means that we inherently need problems in our daily life, along with the fact we can’t get away from it. Problems make life interesting. (Ha!)

Humans are the only creature with the ability to create their own problems, play with it, and solve it. No other creatures can. We are unique that we have brain, mind, and heart. Depending on how we use them, the combination of these three determine whether we have a higher degree than angels or even lower than animals. This universe is inherited to us because we are the only creature with wisdom potential who are able to take care of it, improve it, and sustain it.

 
Hard work never killed a man. Men die of boredom, psychological conflict and disease, not hard work.
— David Ogilvy